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The Worlds Biggest Marine Diesel Engines

 

Marine technology has taken some highly innovative steps over the years. Diesel marine engines are by no means an exception to this fact. With the demand for internationally shipped goods and marine luxury travel increasing every day, the need for powerful marine engines to power these grandiose ships has become more and more imperative.

dredger  vessel  for mining diesel unknown

 

Here we illustrate some of the world’s biggest engines available. Although you may never need one this size, it’s interesting to note the developments in diesel engines, and you can clearly see how far technology has developed within the field.

Rudolf Diesel (1858-1913)

Born in Paris in 1858, Rudolf Diesel was an engineer best known for the invention of the diesel engine that he first successfully operated in 1897.

In 1900, Diesel first ran his engine (AKA the compression-ignition internal combustion engine) at the World Exhibition in Paris. The engine was, back then, run entirely on peanut oil, an accomplishment that to this day is highly praised by technicians and engineers across the globe. Rudolf Diesel officially patented the engine design on February 28, 1892.

Diesel died tragically on Sept 29th, 1913 when he disappeared from the Steamship Dresden while travelling from Antwerp, Belgium to Harwick, England. On October 10th 1913 his body was recovered from the English Channel. To this day, his death is considered one of history’s great mysteries. Although Diesel’s death was deemed a suicide, many believed and still believe that he was a victim of foul play.

Since then modern technology and engineering have substantially improved his original design into the massive marine diesel engines used in today’s cargo ships, submarines and locomotives (to name a few).

Wartsila-Sulzer RT-flex 96C

This two-stroke, turbocharged, low-speed diesel engine was designed by Finnish manufacturer Wartsila, specifically for large container ships that run on heavy fuel. The Wartsila- Sulzer RTA96C is currently the world’s largest reciprocating engine in the world.

Put into service in September 2006 aboard the Emma Maersk, it’s common-rail technology along with a traditional camshaft, chain gear, fuel pumps and hydraulic actuators provides incredible performance at impressively low resolutions per minute, as well as low fuel consumption and much lower harmful emissions.

The Wartsila-Sulzer TF -flex 96C weighs in at a whopping 2300 tons and is 44 feet tall and 90 feet long.

M32CV

Introduced in 2000 the M32CV engine is available in both 12 and 16 cylinder versions. The engine boasts both a bore of 320 mm and a 460m stroke able to cover a power range of 6000-8000KW in the 750 and 750-rpm ranges.

MAN 48/60

The MAN 48/60 medium speed turbo diesel engine is a technologically advanced engine. It is typically used as a propulsion or power generation unit in large marine vessels. This engine is close to 10 meters long, weighs in at approximately 120 tons and holds an impressive 8400-kilowatt rating.

One of the many innovative features of this mammoth sized diesel engine is that one the 48/60’s seven cylinders have the ability to be converted to handle natural gas.

Choosing the right diesel engine/motor

Choosing the best possible diesel engine or diesel motors depends entirely on the size and weight of your vessel. Whether you are planning to haul large cargo via marine vessel, building a large cruise ship or simply want to add the best in marine diesel engines to your vessel, then it is important that you research an engine that will provide you the longest possible life.

Luckily, in today’s Internet-based world there are many options and reviews available to assist you in your purchase. Find a reputable supplier who can give you good advice and you’ll soon settle on the right engine for you.

 

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I am not myself in any degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. Be the change that you wish to see in the world and contribute your 2 cents to us , just like i did .I write articles as my hobby and interest ..how about you :)

 
 

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